Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose, commonly known as blood sugar. This occurs either because the body cannot produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar) or because the cells do not respond adequately to insulin. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1, often diagnosed in childhood, results from the immune system attacking and destroying insulin-producing cells; Type 2, more common in adulthood, involves insulin resistance and inadequate insulin production. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications, including cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, nerve damage, and vision impairment. Management involves lifestyle modifications, medication, and, in some cases, insulin therapy, aiming to maintain blood sugar levels within a target range to prevent complications and promote overall well-being.

Physical therapy plays a vital role in the management of diabetes by addressing musculoskeletal issues, promoting physical activity, and supporting overall well-being. Individuals with diabetes often experience complications such as peripheral neuropathy and reduced joint mobility. Physical therapists design exercise programs to improve flexibility, strength, and balance, reducing the risk of falls and injuries. Cardiovascular exercises prescribed by physical therapists can help control blood sugar levels and enhance heart health. Moreover, physical therapy contributes to weight management, a crucial aspect of diabetes control. Education on proper foot care and biomechanics is essential in preventing diabetic foot complications. By addressing these aspects, physical therapy not only enhances the quality of life for individuals with diabetes but also supports the holistic management of the condition, complementing medical interventions and lifestyle modifications. Regular consultations with physical therapists empower individuals to actively engage in their health, promoting better diabetes control and reducing the risk of complications.