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A beginner’s guide to outdoor running

A beginner’s guide to outdoor running

Chiropractor-approved tips

You’ve made the decision to take your cardio routine from the treadmill to the sidewalk – congratulations! You’re on your way to reaping some amazing benefits. If you’re feeling wary about transitioning your routine to a new location, we’ve got you covered. With a good pair of running shoes and some healthy preparation, you can get the most out of your running session outdoors.

Note: Running is a high-impact activity. If you’ve never run before, please consult a chiropractor/medical practitioner to ensure you won’t worsen any pre-existing conditions or cause injury to your joints.

Here are some tips to help get you started:

Warm up and cool down: Make sure you stretch before and after your run. Stretches are an essential part of your running routine to avoid injuries. Some important points to keep in mind:

  • Never stretch a cold muscle
  • Hold each stretch for a slow count of 30
  • Repeat twice on each side
  • Don’t overstretch—be comfortable
  • Don’t bounce when stretching

Pick a road or trail you are familiar with: When starting out, the last thing you want to worry about is getting lost. Before you lace up your sneakers, do some research: ask friends where they like to run, use online running forums to find popular routes, and check to see if your park has designated trails. The more popular and visible the trail, the better.

Wear the appropriate footwear: Adapt your shoes to your environment. A regular running sneaker works for the flat, predictable surface of a treadmill. But once you are outdoors, make sure the sneaker’s tread can handle the gravel, dirt roads, and slick trails. Runners should get a sneaker that supports the feet while having the appropriate sole to help maneuver and provide support over uneven surfaces.

Start slow: Running outside is more taxing on your muscles, joints and bones, making you more prone to injuries like shin splints. Start off with shorter distances on flat roads or trails. As your endurance improves, gradually increase your mileage and hill work.

Maintain a constant pace: Don’t feel compelled to push yourself to run at the same pace that you would on a treadmill. Start with moderate and comfortable pace that allows you to run safely, and gradually increase your speed over several weeks as your body allows.

If you’ve been running on a treadmill for a while, transitioning to the outdoors may take time. The mechanics of running on a stationary treadmill are different than running outside on an uneven surface.

Originally published June 2016 by the Canadian Chiropractic Association

1Shape Magazine, “Don’t make these mistakes when running. https://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/dont-make-these-mistakes-when-running-outdoors

2Popsugar, 4 things you need to know before running outside. https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Tips-Running-Outside-28328027
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The Hidden Cost of Stress

The Hidden Cost of Stress

April is Stress Awareness Month

Most of us in our fast-paced, technology driven, multi-tasking lives have experienced some form of stress. Stress is a state in which internal stability is actually threatened or perceived to be threatened. When it comes to human beings, stress can be actual (real), anticipated and/or imagined while animals respond to actual (real) threat only which is an advantage to them.

Causes of Stress

Isolated events such as sudden unemployment, marriage breakup, death of a loved one are undoubtedly potent sources of stress, but chronic daily stressors are more insidious and more harmful causing long term biological consequences. Stress is cumulative-unmetabolized childhood events as far as from two years of age form unconscious beliefs which drive one‘s life. For those habituated to high levels of internal stress since early childhood, it‘s the absence of this stress that creates unease, boredom and meaninglessness which drives their addiction of accomplishment. These people have a strong sense of time urgency, can‘t relax, are insecure about their status, are highly competitive and are easily angered when life doesn‘t meet their expectations.

There‘s nothing wrong in being a “go-getter”, only if you are motivating force is your inner creativity and you are not working hard to prove your worth to the world. Some common symptoms of stress are anxiety in relationships, anxiety related to work, worry, fear, depression, hostility, irritability, resentment, chronic pain, headaches, neck pain, muscle tension, high blood pressure, abdominal pain, stomach ulcers, indigestion and sleep related issues. Symptoms are nothing but body‘s way to bring attention to your suppressed emotions and feelings .You may suppress symptoms by comfort foods, alcohol, recreational drugs, internet, over exercising, social withdrawal or take medications which provide relief for short time but if root cause is not addressed long term serious health consequences happen. Most people are more externally aware such as traffic, weather, and time of the day or their bank balance but have lost internal awareness of physical sensations in the body, feelings, discomfort. Let‘s dedicate this month to connect with ourselves as disconnection with self is the primary suffering. ?

Here are few tips to become self aware:

1. Take a body inventory or run a body scan from toe to head few times a day to connect yourself to your inner world. Body awareness is the ability to recognize how your body reacts to stressors in your life and is the most powerful step to healing.

2. Breathing is a fundamental necessity of life which most of us take for granted. The easiest way to connect to body is through breath, use breathing to increase awareness of inner peace.

3. Build Mindfulness muscle at least 10 minutes every day. When eating just eat, when talking to your kids, just talk, when walking –just walk.

4. Take relaxation breaks every 2 ½ hours throughout the day for 3-20 minutes.

5. Remind yourself that you don‘t have to do what everyone else is doing. Comparing self to others is a form of self abuse.

6. Connect to nature – It doesn‘t rush, yet accomplishes everything.

7. Pray, meditate or practice slow deep breathing exercises for at least 11 minutes before bed to increase melatonin levels.

8. Connect with someone you care about today. Tell them how much they mean to you.

9. Devote 10 minutes every day to doing something you love.

10. Say “No” to something that bothers you in your life today. Acknowledge an inner conflict or fear. Share it with a partner or friend, and encourage them to do the same

11. Laugh deeply each day- the brain secretes all the good chemicals even if it‘s fake.

Thank you for reading!
Dr. Priya Duggal, ND (Naturopathic Doctor)

Dr. Priya Duggal, ND is passionate to asisst everyone live to their full potential and uses “Compassionate Inquiry” -A psychotherapeutic approach developed by Dr. Gabor Mate, Md as a modality to assist her patients cope with stress related health conditions.  

Book an appointment with Dr. Priya by emailing her at priya@fitforlifewellnessclinic.com OR contact our clinic directly at 647-874-4490. 

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How Sitting Is the New Smoking

How Sitting Is the New Smoking

There’s no sugar-coating it: North Americans sit a lot. Two-thirds of the North American workforce sits for all or part of their workday.1 When you don’t adjust your posture frequently enough, you’re more likely to experience discomfort while sitting—and you’re inviting a whole host of other musculoskeletal problems along with it.1

Today, on average, sitting takes up more than half of an adult’s waking hours.2What’s worse is that, according to Mayo Clinic cardiologist Martha Grogan, “for people who sit most of the day, their risk of heart attack is about the same as smoking.”3 Based on current trends, researchers predict the number of hours we spend sedentary will likely increase.2

There are other health risks that come from being more sedentary: prolonged time spent while sitting or reclining can tamper with your glucose levels and your metabolism.4 It’s also a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.4 The good news is that if you break up those long periods of sitting, you can reduce your risk of having diabetes, heart disease, or stroke.4

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada5 recommends at least thirty minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity—such as brisk walking or bike riding—at least five days out of the week. If you work Monday to Friday, consider adding a few steps to your commute, or taking two 15 minute walk breaks each workday.

Here are some more helpful tips to help break up your sitting time6,7:

  • Create a schedule to remind you to stand up and move. Programming your day can help you stick to something you may otherwise forget to do. A good goal is 5–10 minutes of activity per hour. For example, if you have a job that involves sitting most of the day, plan to spend five minutes every hour up from your chair and moving around the office (like getting coffee, walking around the building, or taking a restroom break) and spend the other five minutes doing stretches.
  • Walk around on your lunch break. Invite coworkers from your office to go for a walk with you at lunch. You can check out a nearby park or take a new route around the neighbourhood.
  • Park further away and walk. Whether you’re running errands or parking at work, you can choose to park further away and walk those extra few steps to your destination.
  • Walk around the house while talking on the phone or during commercial breaks of your favourite show. You might find other opportunities throughout the day too!

Little changes can go a long way to improve your posture and decrease a number of health risks. Whatever method you choose, you can also use the Straighten Up Canada app and Fit-in 15 program to find small exercises you can do during the day.

 

References

  1. Fenety A, Walker JM. Short-term effects of workstation exercises on musculoskeletal discomfort and postural changes in seated video display unit workers. J Am Phys Ther Assoc. 2002; 82(6): 578-89.
  1. Healy GN, Eakin EG, Owen N, et al. A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce office workers’ sitting time. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016; 48(9): 1787-97. doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000000972.
  1. Winslow, R. The guide to beating a heart attack: first line defense is lowering risk, even when genetics isn’t on your side. The Wall Street Journal. April 16, 2012. http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304818404577347982400815676. Accessed November 25, 2016.
  1. Benatti FB, Ried-Larsen M. The effects of breaking up prolonged sitting time. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2015; 47(10): 2053-61. doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000000654.
  1. Stay active. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. 2016. Available at: http://www.heartandstroke.ca/get-healthy/stay-active#How-much-activity-do-I-need. Accessed November 22, 2016.
  1. Storrs C. Stand up, sit less and move more, researchers say; here’s how to do it. CNN. August 6, 2015. Available at: http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/06/health/how-to-move-more/. Accessed October 14, 2016.
  1. Sit less. The Heart Foundation. Available at: https://heartfoundation.org.au/active-living/sit-less. Accessed October 14, 2016.
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9 Tips to Stay Active during the Winter Months

9 Tips to Stay Active during the Winter Months

When it gets cold outside, we tend to spend more time indoors doing sedentary activities and it can be difficult to stay active. It’s helpful to plan ahead and set some time aside in your schedule a few days a week to make sure you’re getting the activity you need.

To have health benefits from exercise, adults need a total of 2.5 hours of activity spread across the week, in bouts of ten minutes or more. These activities need to be moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic activities. Moderate-intensity physical activities include brisk walking or bike riding. Generally, you know your activity is moderate-intensity if you sweat a little and breathe harder than when you’re moving about day-to-day. Vigorous-intensity activities include jogging or cross-country skiing, and you’re likely to find yourself sweating and feeling out of breath.1

Here are a few tips to help keep you motivated to stay active during the winter months2:

  • Plan activities ahead. When activities are in your calendar, you’re less likely to forget them. Preparedness also helps set good habits.
  • Find a fun local activity, like snow shoeing, skiing, skating, or cross-country skiing.
  • Dress in layers. Insulate your body. When you can keep your body warm, it’s easier to continue being active outside.
  • Use your daylight hours. It’s easier to stay outside while it’s still light out. It’s easy to miss out on activities when you start them too late in the day.
  • Find indoor activities at your local community centre. This could be aerobics classes, badminton, basketball, or yoga classes.
  • Climb stairs. Deliberately add more steps to your day. Consider going up and down a flight in your home, the mall, or an office building more than once over the course of your regular daily activities. As little as five minutes can make a huge difference for your health.
  • Visit a library to find more motivation. There are plenty of free exercise DVDs you can borrow, including dance, step, aerobics, or Pilates. You can use the return date as a deadline to pick up another one!
  • Sign up for a fun run. You can often find non-competitive “fun runs” in your community that are usually between 5 and 10 kilometers. You can invite friends and family to join in!
  • Find an activity buddy. Find someone willing to commit to being active as often as you are, and set a plan. That could be planning to meet for morning walks or afternoon workouts. Having a friend keeps you accountable.

Whatever your activity level is, remember to stay hydrated. It is easy to forget to drink water when it’s cold out, but your body needs just as much hydration in a snowstorm as it does in a heatwave.2

Most importantly, stay motivated. Revisit your goals (or look for tips to set new ones) to make sure you’re still on track. Plan ahead and make sure you can envision your goal as you look ahead towards the finish line.

Here’s to staying active in the new year!

 

References

  1. Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines. 1st ed. CSEP; 2016. Available at: http://www.csep.ca/CMFIles/Guidelines/CSEP_PAGuidelines_adults_en.pdf. Accessed November 7, 2016.
  1. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. 11 ways to stay active in winter. 2009. Heartandstroke.ca. Available at: http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=ikIQLcMWJtE&b=4832209&ct=7596299. Accessed November 7, 2016.
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Can a Cough Crack a Rib?

Can a Cough Crack a Rib?

In short, unfortunately, yes, if the cough is prolonged, repetitive and compounding underlying bone density issues. Do not be alarmed.  A rib fracture (one rib) is not life threatening, however, can be extremely painful. They typically occur under the breast and a little off to the side of the torso.

Rib Fracture

Rib Fracture

A patient (age 40) visited us after she had a flu and cough for 8 days week. She said she coughed so much that it make her body hurt.  After one particular coughing spell, she explained that she had pain along the torso and along the rib.  Again in our office, two days after the initial incident, she felt immediate sharpness and pain when she coughed or when we touched the area.  The area was not red, but it was extremely sensitive and tender to the touch.  We advised she see her family doctor for examination and imaging.  She visited her family doctor after our discussion and had x-rays taken. The next day she came by our clinic to share the results. The x-rays confirmed a hairline fracture along the 5th left rib.  The rib was in proper position and would heal naturally on its own. Her doctor also advised a bone density scan. A bone density test enhances the accuracy of calculating your risk of breaking bones.  A bone density test uses X-rays to measure how many grams of calcium and other bone minerals are packed into a segment of bone. The bones that are most commonly tested are in the spine, hip and forearm.  Doctors use bone density testing to: Identify decreases in bone density before you break a bone, determine your risk of broken bones (fractures), confirm a diagnosis of osteoporosis and monitor osteoporosis treatment. Osteoporosis a medical condition in which the bones become brittle and fragile from loss of tissue, typically as a result of hormonal changes, or deficiency of calcium or vitamin D. Our patient asked if there was anything we could do. Her family doctor felt that some pain medication and follow up with us for pain control therapy would be beneficial. 

We explained that ice over the area would help with pain control.  She asked if we could use laser therapy to assist the soft tissue tenderness. We proceeded with laser therapy treatments which helped with healing of the soft tissue in the area along with tenderness.  After 3 treatments within a one week period, her tenderness had decreased 50%. This was exciting for our patient and for us.  After an additional 3 treatments of  laser therapy and ice therapy over 2 weeks, we were able to improve the condition almost 100%. Our patient was extremely happy with the results.  She followed up with us after her bone density test, to advise us that her bone density was in the normal range.

Please note that although one rib fracture is typically not dangerous, the same cannot be said for multiple rib fractures. Multiple ribs fractures can be dangerous as they can lead to flail chest or an open chest wound. They usually occur due to trauma, car accidents or falls. The main goals in the treatment of multiple rib fractures are control of pain, support of respiratory function, and stabilization of the chest wall either through mechanical ventilation or surgical fracture fixation.  Please seek immediate medical attention if you suspect multiple rib breaks/fracture.

Provided by Dr. Luciano Di Loreto, HBSc., D.C. & Associates

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Dr. Luciano Di Loreto graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (2010) as a Doctor of Chiropractic and obtained a certificate in Medical Acupuncture at McMaster University (2010). At his practice located in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto combines evidence-based chiropractic care with a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach to health care. He is an approachable, passionate, and diligent practitioner with a focus on delivering exceptional acute, preventative, rehabilitative and supportive care for a variety conditions relating to the muscle, nerve, and bone. During his spare time, Dr. Luciano Di Loreto takes pleasure in spending time with his family and friends. He enjoys fishing and playing sports.

Fit for Life Wellness & Rehabilitation Centre is a health clinic located in Vaughan, Ontario, just north of Major Mackenzie on Weston Road (Located in the Vellore Medical Centre & Walk In Clinic at 10395 Weston Road, Unit A., Woodbridge Ontario L4H 3T4). If you have questions for Dr. Luciano Di Loreto & Associates, please comment or email us and we will get right back to you promptly with information on your conditions/concerns.

 

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