All posts by Luciano Di Loreto

Vegetables and fruits are good for you

Vegetables and fruits are good for you

Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy eating pattern. Eating a variety of vegetables and fruits may lower your risk of heart disease

Vegetables and fruits have important nutrients such as:

fibre
vitamins
minerals
Include plenty of vegetables and fruits in your meals and snacks. Try making half of your plate vegetables and fruits.

Choose different textures, colours and shapes to fit your taste. From apples to zucchini, choose plenty of vegetables and fruits.

Try a variety of vegetables and fruits such as:

pears
apples
berries
broccoli
peaches
cabbage
leafy greens
Fruit juice and fruit juice concentrates are high in sugars. Replace juice with water. Choose whole or cut vegetables and fruits instead of juice.

Choosing and preparing healthy vegetables and fruits
Fresh, frozen or canned vegetables and fruits can all be healthy options.

Frozen and canned vegetables and fruits:

take little time to prepare
are a healthy and convenient option
are just as nutritious as fresh vegetables and fruits
Frozen vegetables and fruits
Choose frozen vegetables and fruits without:

added sugars
added seasonings
breading or rich sauces
You can add frozen vegetables and fruits to soup or chili.

Canned vegetables and fruits
Choose canned vegetables with little to no added sodium.

Drain and rinse canned vegetables to lower the sodium content.

Choose canned fruit with little to no added sugars.

Use the food labels to help you compare canned vegetables and fruits.

The % daily value helps you see if a food has a little or a lot of a nutrient.

Dried fruit
Dried fruit can be a part of healthy eating but it can stick to your teeth and cause cavities. If you choose dried fruit, eat it with meals.

Preparing vegetables
Try healthier cooking methods like:

baking
roasting
steaming
stir-frying
Enhance the flavour by adding:

olive oil
lemon juice
flavoured vinegar
fresh or dried herbs or spices
Snack ideas
Vegetables and fruits make quick and healthy snacks. There are lots to choose from and many healthy ways to prepare them.

Vegetable snacking tips
Keep cut up fresh vegetables in the fridge for a quick and healthy snack. Try:

broccoli
cauliflower
carrot sticks
celery sticks
cucumber slices
Fruit snacking tips
Keep a bowl of fresh fruit on the counter as an easy snack to grab.

Add fruit to whole grain cereals or lower fat yogurt. Try:

bananas
mangoes
frozen berries
canned peaches packed in water
Freeze seedless grapes on a tray and enjoy them as a snack.

How to eat more vegetables
Here are some easy ways to eat more vegetables:

Add canned pumpkin or squash purée to any soup to make it extra rich and creamy.
Wash, chop and refrigerate or freeze extra vegetables when preparing meals so you have extra for meals the next day.
Use pre-bagged vegetables that can be quickly tossed in a salad, stir-fry or casserole. Try:
baby carrots
green beans
leafy greens
Serve raw vegetables with your meals. Try:
cucumber
cherry or grape tomatoes
red, yellow or green peppers
Try new recipes that call for different types of leafy greens such as:
kale
spinach
bok choy
Swiss chard
mixed salad greens
How to eat more fruits
Fruits are a delicious addition to your day. Here are some easy ways to eat more fruit:

For dessert, choose:
oranges
fruit salad, with little to no added sugars
Add fresh fruits to salads. Try adding sliced:
pears
peaches
strawberries
Add frozen fruits to baking.
Wash, cut and refrigerate extra fruit so you can have some on hand for meals and snacks.

Please follow and like us:
error
More

Recreational activities to minimize stress and prevent back pain

Recreational activities to minimize stress and prevent back pain

Going to the chiropractor can help relieve pain and prevent injuries, but being active is also a great way to help keep your spine healthy. Just going for a brisk 10 minute walk each day is enough to help improve your health and prevent conditions of the spine, joints and supporting structures of the body. But there are also a few other recreational activities that you can incorporate into your daily routine to prevent back pain and reduce stress.

Here are a few suggestions and why you may benefit from them:

Yoga and Pilates:

Yoga and Pilates are forms of exercise that typically focus on moving the body while focusing on breathing and body awareness. The poses are purposeful and usually work a few areas of the body at once, including the back and leg muscles to build a stronger foundation for other movements. Also, the poses often focus on balance which can be important to prevent falls and injuries as we age. Compared to higher impact activities that cause added strain to the body, Yoga and Pilates are known to be ‘safe’ for healthy and even injured individuals. Yet, with most practices being keenly aware of your body is important and adapting movement to your skill level. However, regular practice has been shown to decrease back pain1. The great thing about Yoga and Pilates is that there are several types of classes catered to your specific skill and comfort level.

Aquafitness

Aquafitness is a dynamic, low impact activity that usually involves the entire body in movement, including the abdominals, gluteal, and leg muscles. Since the movements are done in water, the water adds extra resistance to strengthen muscles but also minimizes impact on your joints. Aquafitness has been shown to be an effective management tool for those suffering from certain MSK injuries allowing them to keep active. Notably, people suffering from low back pain2 may particularly benefit from aquafitness or gently swimming in water. Contact your local community centre or gym to see if aquafitness is part of their regular programming.

Tai Chi

This Chinese martial art focuses on meditative, deep breathing combined with methodical practice of slow movement enhancing mobility and balance among those who practice the art. Tai Chi is known to have major health benefits – even for those with back pain. Tai Chi can improve pain and function, while decreasing likelihood of chronic pain. It is a safe and effective activity for those experiencing long-term back pain symptoms3.

Other activities you may want to consider are low-impact cardiovascular exercises such as walking or striding on the elliptical machine. There are always alternatives to staying active, even when you experience pain. Some of these can even help relieve the pain.

If you’re looking for ways to stay active and relieve pain, meet with our team to discuss more options.

Sourced from CCA

1Sherman K,  Cherkin D, Wellman R, Cook A, Hawkes R,  Delaney K, Deyo R. A Randomized Trial Comparing Yoga, Stretching, and a Self-care Book for Chronic Low Back Pain. Arch Intern Med. 2011 Dec 12; 171(22): 2019–2026.

2Ariyoshi MSonoda KNagata KMashima TZenmyo MPaku CTakamiya YYoshimatsu HHirai YYasunaga HAkashi H,Imayama HShimokobe TInoue AMutoh Y. Efficacy of aquatic exercises for patients with low-back pain. Kurume Med J. 1999;46(2):91-6.

3Hall AMMaher CGLam PFerreira MLatimer J. Tai chi exercise for treatment of pain and disability in people with persistent low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Nov;63(11):1576-83.
Please follow and like us:
error
More

10 Chiropractic Research updates you need to know

10 Chiropractic Research updates you need to know

What impact is research having to advance healthcare, the chiropractic profession and patient care?

For the last decade, the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation was working to achieve one goal—to place chiropractic researchers in Canadian universities for the first time in history. With the help of generous donors, this goal was successfully achieved in 2017.

Check out for yourself how donations are making a difference!

University Affiliation

  • 13 CCRF Research Chairs placed in universities across Canada—seven are tenured; two are tenure-track.
  • Chiropractic researchers are working with multidisciplinary health teams, educating medical students, breaking down barriers and building inter-professional networks.

Disease & Disability Prevention

  • Discovery of a therapy halting the progression of Degenerative Disc Disease, a condition that creates significant disability, expense and the highest number of disability-affected years globally.
  • Evidence-based treatment protocols developed for mechanical, degenerative and inflammatory spinal disorders.

Multidisciplinary Collaboration

  • Working with healthcare teams in Denmark, U.S, Switzerland, Australia, Cuba, Hong Kong, UK, South America and more.
  • Industry collaborations with CCGI, CCA, Provincial Associations, Research Manitoba, World Federation of Chiropractic, World Spine Care Research Committee, Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis (IMHA) and more.

Healthcare Integration

Patient Care and Practice Development

Sourced from CCA Blog

Please follow and like us:
error
More

What is the Difference between Acute and Chronic Back Pain?

What is the Difference between Acute and Chronic Back Pain?

Acute or short-term low back pain generally lasts from a few days to a few weeks. Most acute back pain is the result of trauma to the lower back or a disorder such as arthritis. Pain from trauma may be caused by a sports injury, work around the house or in the garden, or a sudden jolt such as a car accident or other stress on spinal bones and tissues. Symptoms may range from muscle ache to shooting or stabbing pain, limited flexibility and range of motion, or an inability to stand straight. Chronic back pain is pain that persists for more than 3 months. It is often progressive and the cause can be difficult to determine.

Most patients with back pain recover without residual functional loss, but individuals should contact a doctor if there is not a noticeable reduction in pain and inflammation after 72 hours of self-care.  Recurring back pain resulting from improper body mechanics or other nontraumatic causes is often preventable. Engaging in exercises that don’t jolt or strain the back, maintaining correct posture, and lifting objects properly can help prevent injuries. Many work-related injuries are caused or aggravated by stressors such as heavy lifting, vibration, repetitive motion, and awkward posture. Applying ergonomic principles — designing furniture and tools to protect the body from injury — at home and in the workplace can greatly reduce the risk of back injury and help maintain a healthy back.

Sourced from NINDS

Please follow and like us:
error
More

High- and Low-Impact Activities for Everyone

High- and Low-Impact Activities for Everyone

It is no secret that at the Canadian Chiropractic Association (CCA) we often promote the benefits of regular physical activity as a way to stay healthy and happy. In fact, the CCA thinks it’s so important that we’ve created a free app: Straighten Up Canada! The app is currently available for download via Apple StoreGoogle Play and Blackberry World. Featuring easy-to-follow exercises, it helps to improve your posture and allows you to stay active during your day!

Investing time to do activities or sports that you enjoy is key to healthy aging and an active lifestyle. Being physically active is often a good way to prevent and manage musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries as well as helping maintain strength and mobility. Varying your routine between high- and low-impact activities is a great way to modify your workouts and challenge the body. We’ve outlined some great suggestions for both so you can get up and get moving!

High Impact

High-impact exercise is typically described as an (often aerobic) activity where both feet leave the ground at the same time1. Often, high-impact activities may include exercise classes which involve jumping, leaping, or jogging in place. Doing high-impact exercise can put you at greater risk of injury if your body is not prepared, especially if you’re just starting out. Be cautious and adapt to a lower impact version of the activity if in doubt. Otherwise, before starting high-impact exercises make sure you have warmed-up.

Good examples of high-impact exercises are:

  • Jumping jacks
  • Jumping rope
  • Running or jogging on a treadmill (or outdoors)
  • Performing plyometric exercises

High-impact exercises tend to be more intense and expend more energy, so it’s important that if you’re doing high-impact exercises that you’re well-prepared. For some, high-impact exercises are not appropriate: they may increase the risk of injury, commonly to the ankles, knees, hips, and even the back. That being said, high-impact exercises can have a lot of great benefits too2:

  • Improves bone density
  • Increases an individual’s heart rate more quickly, thereby burning more calories
  • Improves a person’s stability, balance, and coordination
  • Strengthens the heart and lungs

Low Impact3

Low-impact exercise tends to be less jarring on the body and joints, and less intense overall. According to the American Council on Exercise, keeping at least one foot on the ground at all times also reduces your risk of musculoskeletal injury. Some examples include4:

  • Working out on an elliptical machine
  • Low-impact aerobics
  • Using a rowing machine
  • Home exercise
  • Walking
  • Dancing
  • Cycling
  • Swimming
  • Nordic walking

It’s important to realize that low impact doesn’t mean low intensity (unless purposely designed to be so) because you can still get an intense workout keeping both feet on the ground. Low-impact exercises are great for beginners, people with arthritis or osteoporosis, older adults, individuals who are obese, pregnant women, and people with bone, joint, or connective tissue injuries.

Whichever form of physical activity you choose, make sure you do it safely.

Provided by the Canadian Chiropractic Association

References

1Amy Gonsalves, “High Impact versus low impact.” Diabetes Outside blog. April 19, 2011. https://blog.diabetesoutside.com/?p=1060

2Paige Waehner, “High Impact Exercise—Is High Impact Exercise Right for You?” VeryWell.com. May 2, 2016. https://www.verywell.com/is-high-impact-exercise-right-for-you-1230821

3Nicole Nichols, “low impact vs. high impact exercise: Which is right for you?” SparkPeople.com. April 14, 2010. https://www.sparkpeople.com/blog/blog.asp?post=fitness_defined_lowimpact_and_highimpact_exercises

4NHS, “Easy exercises.” NHS Choices. Page last reviewed: 01/03/2016. https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/Lowimpact.aspx
Please follow and like us:
error
More

A beginner’s guide to outdoor running

A beginner’s guide to outdoor running

Chiropractor-approved tips

You’ve made the decision to take your cardio routine from the treadmill to the sidewalk – congratulations! You’re on your way to reaping some amazing benefits. If you’re feeling wary about transitioning your routine to a new location, we’ve got you covered. With a good pair of running shoes and some healthy preparation, you can get the most out of your running session outdoors.

Note: Running is a high-impact activity. If you’ve never run before, please consult a chiropractor/medical practitioner to ensure you won’t worsen any pre-existing conditions or cause injury to your joints.

Here are some tips to help get you started:

Warm up and cool down: Make sure you stretch before and after your run. Stretches are an essential part of your running routine to avoid injuries. Some important points to keep in mind:

  • Never stretch a cold muscle
  • Hold each stretch for a slow count of 30
  • Repeat twice on each side
  • Don’t overstretch—be comfortable
  • Don’t bounce when stretching

Pick a road or trail you are familiar with: When starting out, the last thing you want to worry about is getting lost. Before you lace up your sneakers, do some research: ask friends where they like to run, use online running forums to find popular routes, and check to see if your park has designated trails. The more popular and visible the trail, the better.

Wear the appropriate footwear: Adapt your shoes to your environment. A regular running sneaker works for the flat, predictable surface of a treadmill. But once you are outdoors, make sure the sneaker’s tread can handle the gravel, dirt roads, and slick trails. Runners should get a sneaker that supports the feet while having the appropriate sole to help maneuver and provide support over uneven surfaces.

Start slow: Running outside is more taxing on your muscles, joints and bones, making you more prone to injuries like shin splints. Start off with shorter distances on flat roads or trails. As your endurance improves, gradually increase your mileage and hill work.

Maintain a constant pace: Don’t feel compelled to push yourself to run at the same pace that you would on a treadmill. Start with moderate and comfortable pace that allows you to run safely, and gradually increase your speed over several weeks as your body allows.

If you’ve been running on a treadmill for a while, transitioning to the outdoors may take time. The mechanics of running on a stationary treadmill are different than running outside on an uneven surface.

Originally published June 2016 by the Canadian Chiropractic Association

1Shape Magazine, “Don’t make these mistakes when running. https://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/dont-make-these-mistakes-when-running-outdoors

2Popsugar, 4 things you need to know before running outside. https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Tips-Running-Outside-28328027
Please follow and like us:
error
More

The Hidden Cost of Stress

The Hidden Cost of Stress

April is Stress Awareness Month

Most of us in our fast-paced, technology driven, multi-tasking lives have experienced some form of stress. Stress is a state in which internal stability is actually threatened or perceived to be threatened. When it comes to human beings, stress can be actual (real), anticipated and/or imagined while animals respond to actual (real) threat only which is an advantage to them.

Causes of Stress

Isolated events such as sudden unemployment, marriage breakup, death of a loved one are undoubtedly potent sources of stress, but chronic daily stressors are more insidious and more harmful causing long term biological consequences. Stress is cumulative-unmetabolized childhood events as far as from two years of age form unconscious beliefs which drive one‘s life. For those habituated to high levels of internal stress since early childhood, it‘s the absence of this stress that creates unease, boredom and meaninglessness which drives their addiction of accomplishment. These people have a strong sense of time urgency, can‘t relax, are insecure about their status, are highly competitive and are easily angered when life doesn‘t meet their expectations.

There‘s nothing wrong in being a “go-getter”, only if you are motivating force is your inner creativity and you are not working hard to prove your worth to the world. Some common symptoms of stress are anxiety in relationships, anxiety related to work, worry, fear, depression, hostility, irritability, resentment, chronic pain, headaches, neck pain, muscle tension, high blood pressure, abdominal pain, stomach ulcers, indigestion and sleep related issues. Symptoms are nothing but body‘s way to bring attention to your suppressed emotions and feelings .You may suppress symptoms by comfort foods, alcohol, recreational drugs, internet, over exercising, social withdrawal or take medications which provide relief for short time but if root cause is not addressed long term serious health consequences happen. Most people are more externally aware such as traffic, weather, and time of the day or their bank balance but have lost internal awareness of physical sensations in the body, feelings, discomfort. Let‘s dedicate this month to connect with ourselves as disconnection with self is the primary suffering. ?

Here are few tips to become self aware:

1. Take a body inventory or run a body scan from toe to head few times a day to connect yourself to your inner world. Body awareness is the ability to recognize how your body reacts to stressors in your life and is the most powerful step to healing.

2. Breathing is a fundamental necessity of life which most of us take for granted. The easiest way to connect to body is through breath, use breathing to increase awareness of inner peace.

3. Build Mindfulness muscle at least 10 minutes every day. When eating just eat, when talking to your kids, just talk, when walking –just walk.

4. Take relaxation breaks every 2 ½ hours throughout the day for 3-20 minutes.

5. Remind yourself that you don‘t have to do what everyone else is doing. Comparing self to others is a form of self abuse.

6. Connect to nature – It doesn‘t rush, yet accomplishes everything.

7. Pray, meditate or practice slow deep breathing exercises for at least 11 minutes before bed to increase melatonin levels.

8. Connect with someone you care about today. Tell them how much they mean to you.

9. Devote 10 minutes every day to doing something you love.

10. Say “No” to something that bothers you in your life today. Acknowledge an inner conflict or fear. Share it with a partner or friend, and encourage them to do the same

11. Laugh deeply each day- the brain secretes all the good chemicals even if it‘s fake.

Thank you for reading!
Dr. Priya Duggal, ND (Naturopathic Doctor)

Dr. Priya Duggal, ND is passionate to asisst everyone live to their full potential and uses “Compassionate Inquiry” -A psychotherapeutic approach developed by Dr. Gabor Mate, Md as a modality to assist her patients cope with stress related health conditions.  

Book an appointment with Dr. Priya by emailing her at priya@fitforlifewellnessclinic.com OR contact our clinic directly at 647-874-4490. 

Please follow and like us:
error
More

The top 6 common myths about chiropractic treatment

The top 6 common myths about chiropractic treatment

Many Canadians continue to have questions about the role that chiropractors play in the healthcare team, and what benefit chiropractic care may have to their health.

1. Once you see a chiropractor you have to keep going back

This is false. When seeking care from a chiropractor, we will perform an assessment including a history and physical examination to determine the cause of the pain or dysfunction. From these observations, a diagnosis will be made and the treatment plan developed in collaboration with the patient – according to their needs and goals. The treatment plan will recommend a number of initial visits to see if the patient responds to care and scheduled re-evaluations. Depending on the patient and the condition, the recommended course of care may vary. Ultimately, the decision to continue care is yours. As a patient, if you have questions or concerns about care, you should feel comfortable to ask the chiropractor for more information on the recommendations made and address any concerns. The care plan should be part of a shared decision-making between the patient and practitioner.

 2. Chiropractors are not ‘real’ doctors

Chiropractors are regulated in all 10 Canadian provinces, and are designated to use the title “doctor” similar to physicians, optometrists and dentists after completing the extensive Doctor of Chiropractic degree program. Those professions who are recognized to use the “doctor” title have extensive training in their area of expertise that allows them to be diagnosticians – to provide a diagnosis.

Chiropractic care in Canada

 3. A medical doctor must refer you to a chiropractor

In all provinces in Canada, chiropractors are primary contact providers, which means you can access them directly. Due to the extensive training of chiropractors as diagnosticians, chiropractors will perform a comprehensive assessment to help determine a diagnosis or clinical impressions. Depending on the outcome, the chiropractor can discuss a course of care or refer to another healthcare professional, as needed. However, in some cases, you may need a referral to access coverage depending on your benefits provider.

4. There is no evidence to support the effectiveness of chiropractic care

Chiropractic treatment is at times questioned on its effectiveness. Yet, the chiropractic profession and others have invested significant resources to build a robust body of evidence studying the impact of manual therapies on MSK conditions. For example, spinal and joint manipulation has been shown to be effective treatment for acute and chronic MSK conditions, like back pain. In fact, spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is recommended as first line intervention for back pain in numerous clinical practice guidelines including the Bone and Joint Decade Task Force1, the American College of Physicians and American Pain Society2 as well as Britain’s National Institute of Health and Care Excellence3.

 5. Chiropractors can only treat back pain

Chiropractors are musculoskeletal (MSK) experts and are trained in assessing, diagnosing, treating and preventing biomechanical disorders that originate from the muscular, skeletal and nervous system. In addition to the evidence that supports chiropractic care in managing musculoskeletal complaints of the spine, there is also evidence that it supports chiropractic management of the extremities, headaches and even TMJ pain,5,6. Chiropractors are also able to provide lifestyle counselling about nutrition, fitness and ergonomics among others that may be useful in managing or preventing a variety of health conditions. The health of your MSK system doesn’t just start with a healthy spine, you need to be fully aware of your health to maintain a well-rounded healthy lifestyle!

 6. Adjustments are painful

In general, adjustments or joint manipulations do not hurt. In fact, many patients report immediate pain relief. Patients may be nervous about the ‘cracking’ or popping sound that may occur during an adjustment. The sound is believed to result from the release of gas bubbles from the joint – similar to cracking your knuckles!

Asking questions about your health and treatment options are very important. You are a partner in your care and your participation is critical to helping us provide the best care to meet your goal. To do so, as a profession, we strive to better understand what information you need to make those important decisions. We want to hear from you! If you have any questions beyond this blog about chiropractic treatment, visit a chiropractor in your area. To learn more about what to expect at your first chiropractic treatment, you can take a look at our online videos.

1Haldeman, S., Carroll, L., Cassidy, J., Schubert, J., & Nygren, A. (2008). The bone and joint decade 2000–2010 task force on neck pain and its associated disorders: Executive summary. Spine, 33(4S), S5-S7. 

2Chou, E., Qaseem, A., Snow, V., Casey, D., Cross, T., Shekelle, P., & Owens, D. (2007). Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: A joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society. Annals of Internal Medicine, 147(7), 478-491. 

3National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. (2009). Low back pain early management of persistent non-specific low back pain. Londres, Angleterre. 

4Hoskins, W., McHardy, A., Pollard, H., Windsham, R., & Onley, R. (2006). Chiropractic treatment of lower extremity conditions: a literature review. Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics, 29(8), 658-671. 

5McHardy, A., Hoskins, W., Pollard, H., Onley, R., & Windsham, R. (2008). Chiropractic treatment of upper extremity conditions: a systematic review. Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics, 31(2), 146-159. 

6Bryans, R., Descarreaux, M., Duranleau, M., Marcoux, H., Potter, B., Reugg, R., White, E., & , (2011). Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with headache. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 34(5), 274-289.
Please follow and like us:
error
More

Your smartphone could be causing your neck pain

Your smartphone could be causing your neck pain

Do you ever ask yourself why your neck is so stiff, or why you have that nagging headache that doesn’t seem to want to go away? Neck pain is a common complaint for Canadians that can range from mildly inconvenient to completely debilitating. You’re probably aware that poor posture, hunching over a computer, or falling asleep on the sofa can cause your neck pain. But did you know your smartphone might be to blame?

How prolonged use can cause strain

According to a recent poll by Forum Research, more than a quarter of Canadians use a mobile device at least two hours a day.1 Over the span of a week, that’s 14 hours spent texting, calling and swiping.

So what exactly is happening to your neck while you’re staring at your smartphone? It all has to do with the angle of your head. When you’re sitting or standing in a neutral position, looking forward, your head weighs between 10-12 lbs. As you begin to tilt your head forward 15 degrees, you put stress on your neck, increasing the pressure to 27 lbs. By the time you angle your head 60 degrees to stare at your smartphone, the pressure equates to a whopping 60 lbs. That’s a lot of strain on your neck and spine!

Tips to relieve pain

What can you do to protect your spine and relieve neck pain? We know you can’t completely disconnect from your smartphones – many of us use our devices for work, to stay connected with distant friends and family, and as a source of entertainment after a long day. But there are small changes you can make to reduce the strain over time.

Dr. Sean Lamasz, DC, recommends the following tips to manage “Text Neck:”2

  1. Lift your phone up to eye level

“A simple way to help prevent neck pain associated with these devices is to avoid bending your neck forward,” advises Dr. Lamasz. “Looking at your phone while sitting at your desk? Lean on your elbows, bringing your phone to eye level, allowing you to keep your neck in its neutral position.”

  1. Take a break

Dr. Lamasz suggests implementing the 20-20-20 rule. For every 20 minutes on your mobile device, take a 20-second break and look 20 feet ahead, which will neutralize your spine.

  1. Stretch it out

If you’re looking for something you can do to instantly relieve neck pain, try these eight simple stretches:

Illustration of a woman performing 8 neck stretches

SOURCE: www.drseanlamasz.com/blog/2019/2/14/text-neck

Please follow and like us:
error
More

Naturopathic Medicine helping you feel better naturally!

Naturopathic Medicine helping you feel better naturally!

Interested to get to the root cause of your health issue or just want to take control of your health.

Book an appointment with Dr. Priya Duggal, ND.

Dr. Priya provides personalized, patient- centered approach addressing the whole person.

Her areas of expertise are- Autoimmune conditions, Anxiety, Arthritis,Allergies,food sensitivities,Chronic pain,Digestive concerns, Depression,Skin rash-Eczema and Psoriasis, Pre-conception health, Women’s health, hormone balancing, Weight loss ,Thyroid care and Optimal aging.

Dr. Priya utilizes advanced lab testing such as food sensitivity test,male and female hormonal panel, inflammation panel and heavy metal analysis to find the underlying cause.

Call today to book a free 15 minute consult with Dr. Priya .Even If your condition is not listed above, book a complimentary visit to find out how Naturopathic Medicine can help you.

Hope to see you soon.

Please follow and like us:
error
More
Follow by Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Instagram